Tag Archives: reincarnation

Heaven – The Selfish Mirage

As a child, I often wondered how would marriage after widow-ship fare with Heaven, if a person was supposed to remain with their spouse in the afterlife. Namely which equally legitimate spouse would be one’s eternal companion.

That, of course, was only one small question regarding this mysterious promised land of peaceful green pastures, where everyone, from infants to the elderly, would dwell until the end of time (or outside of it). Well, everyone minus most people on the planet, since the path to “salvation” is supposed to be so “narrow”, so narrow the troubled souls of the living would have to compete in arduousness in order to squeeze into the fortunate convoy.

Arguably, Hell is a much more grotesque and disturbing concept, yet in its own way, Heaven is as well. Atheism aside, if one is spiritual, the whole idea seems very unfair.

First of all, we should assume that arbitrarily, since God decides who lives or dies, he only allows some people a substantial duration of their existence (growing, maturing, becoming wiser), whilst for others that is cut short without the possibility of fully experiencing life on Earth.

Then, the status of children who die without having been christened comes into question: do they go to Heaven as well, and if not, how is this prospect not morally repugnant enough to make people doubt this religion? Some denominations, such as Orthodoxy, claim no one can enter Heaven without the ceremony in this specific rite. Recently, I’ve come across a fanatic online who didn’t deem such people worthy of a conversation on religion, regardless of their views, which is beyond medieval.

There’s something about clinging on to people who have died that seems a bit selfish, from a spiritual perspective – in terms of imagining they’re simply waiting for one’s presence, stacked on a vaporous shelf somewhere, looking down at the living they left behind.

As someone who believes in reincarnation, I find it more reasonable to think that when souls are freed from their mortal bodies they move on to different experiences and continue to grow through them. Reincarnation has long been studied and at times the search revealed cases where coincidence could only be claimed through the sheer belief that this phenomenon is impossible. The work of Dr Ian Stevenson alone is proof that this subject is anything but fiction or wishful thinking.

 

 

Could Reincarnation Explain Transgenderism and the “Transabled”?

This is just a hypothesis and might be absolute bullshit, but bear with me (unless you dismiss reincarnation altogether).

The thing is, due to personal experience I had gone back and forth on due to religion (Christianity denies the possibility as far as I know), I fully believe in reincarnation now. And because of that I’ve been reading research which highlighted many cases – some of them involving people having been of the opposite sex in the past but knowing remarkable, identifiable details about who they believed to be their past selves and the ways they had died. Some were children. Of course there is no proof they had actually been those people as opposed to having known those people in the past so I’m not saying there is definite proof of migrating from one sex to another between lives.

And I’m in no way saying I think all those who are confused about their gender and bodies are necessarily right about it (perhaps they are just going through a phase and might reconsider), especially nowadays when this sort of thing is encouraged on a mass scale. And I’m in no way saying that should that be the case they should try to butcher their current bodies trying to make them into something they are not (that can be very dangerous and is irreversible should they change their minds).

I do think though that it is possible for their motivation to be a past self (a past life).

The “transabled” puzzle me even more.

For someone who is able-bodied it is naturally a frightening thought to lose some of their physical abilities as life is guaranteed to be more difficult and restraining. What I usually read in these cases is that the person feels a body part or ability does not belong to them. Also, I logically deduce they are not afraid of facing their existence while not having said body part or ability – as if they had managed it in the past. ┬áThis leads me to suspect they might have been disabled and are now mixed up about functioning in their current bodies. One lady wanted to be blind (and succeeded). To anyone who can see this is a terrifying prospect. Unless one has been blind before and can handle life as such, without fear.

Perhaps these people are trying to revert to their former selves.

Again, I am in no way saying physicians should indulge them by mutilating them. It is absolute craziness to “help” someone become impaired just because it feels more natural to them, regardless of what the cause might be. Surely healing the psychological/ emotional aspect and continuing to function in a healthier body would be much more beneficial.

I don’t know. It’s just an idea. Which I’m sure has been thrown out there before, though I haven’t come upon any material but haven’t exactly looked for it either.