Tag Archives: conservatism

Will Most Christians Side With The Right Wing Again, As History Repeats Itself?

In the US at least, right-wing voices are intermingled with that of conservative Christians, all seeming to reach for the same goals, in the grand scheme of things. Of course Christians are greatly diverse, ranging from denominations and their hierarchies to individual believers.

This concern is mostly rooted in the declared support by the current administration of Christian causes, such as promoting religion (and creationism) in schools, stricter abortion laws or a halt in the progressive social engineering (the gender theory etc). While championing for these causes, Christians are being lured into supporting other policies which objectively conflict with their belief system – based on warmongering, xenophobia and corporatism. In terms of warmongering and xenophobia, this phenomenon is oddly reminiscent of the rise of the right in Europe during the 1930s and 40s, in the 20th Century. Though some claim this comparison is a crass exaggeration, there are parallels to be made.

Over the next few years it will be interesting to observe how they will react to the political shift towards isolationism and the ethnic purges envisioned by those favoured to reach power in Europe, as well as those already in power in the US.

Some reactions are positive (in terms of solidarity with the genuine underdog), such as participating in the creation of sanctuaries for immigrants who risk deportation. Indeed, many churches have joined this initiative, together with a number of synagogues and mosques.

The strong message from certain voices is not so encouraging, as many try to get people of faith to engage politically, putting all their support towards the new rise of conservatism, in a manner so uncritical one could compare it to the creation of a cult of personality.

“God will curse Trump’s opponents and their children and grandchildren”

Perhaps no type of rhetoric is more cringey and deserving of a spewing bucket than that of snake-oil-peddling Inforwars&Co, Alex Jones once claiming Trump had been touched by the Holy Ghost, on the night of his inauguration.

Christianity is, nowadays, in the positive sense, associated with humanitarianism, which stands in contrast with most reform ideas conservatives argue for.

Please pardon the minimal research and of-the-cuff nature of this post; the only certainty is that the following years will be very interesting and the true nature of many will be revealed, as individuals and collectives.

 

 

 

Conservatives Using Bona Fide Pro-Life Voters

It’s a known fact that issues such as abortion, the nuclear family and values inspired by religion are still used as leverage in western countries by the political right, making it appear more humanist by giving it a spiritual, ethical dimension, which as a whole it does not possess.

Due to the contradictions listed below, this right wing stance seems a mere ploy to lure well-intended voters who feel increasingly cornered by cultural Marxism, as well as disenfranchised amidst rapid, radical changes to their societies.

After elaborating on their stance on abortion, conservative pundits or commentators immediately imply that in order for it to become the norm, conservatism must be adopted as a package, even if the rest of its precepts are harmful (and potentially murderous) to other vulnerable people.

It is my conclusion that abortion laws are not intended for change by the “system behind the system”, as whenever conservatives do reach power, this issue, so often brought up during campaigns, is cast aside and suffers no significant alterations in the end. As a side observation, they are probably aware that changing the law overnight will not end this phenomenon, after generations have already been brought up to be nihilistic.

Progressive nihilism aside, the right-wing ideology in and of itself contributes greatly to the reasons abortions are sought.

Being pro-life, akin to many other stances attributed to a political persuasion, is not a partisan issue, but a human issue.

 

Berating single mothers and poor families, claiming they “breed for benefits”

Perhaps this should be the first (flaming) red flag when dealing with those who stand against abortion, at the same time incriminating people in a precarious financial situation as irresponsible for conceiving children, either willingly or accidentally.

Some of the main causes of abortion are economic instability, conceiving outside of marriage and the fear of a ruined future (disrupted studies, a diversion from the envisaged trajectory in life etc). Conservatives do nothing to encourage expecting mothers to preserve the hope that they can manage life in this situation. On the contrary – they continually berate them as failures, as promiscuous and future spongers off the state, thus making them think society will shame them if they carry the pregnancy to term. Voices on the far right are known to call for the sterilisation of poor or uneducated people (as the Daily Gutter Mail comment section demonstrates).

In fact, though the general impression is that Planned Parenthood is a product of leftist culture (due to its current support by progressives), its founder, Margaret Sanger, was a renowned eugenicist seeking to purge the US of categories she thought brought nothing to its advancement. She is now chucked in with the cultural Marxist threat, some conservatives failing to see many of their fellow right-wingers openly share Sanger’s views.

By demonising (or even demolishing) the welfare state and cutting assistance for pregnant women in difficult situations, conservatives are going to cause an increase in the number of abortions, not a decrease.

It should be noted that the “poor people should not be allowed to breed” mentality comes at a time when western countries are seeing a downward spiral in reproduction, to the degree of irreversible damage. And still, they insist having children is only moral within the (often temporary) confines of marriage and only when reaching a certain (often temporary) financial situation, which leads to high rates of infertility due to women postponing motherhood. Some of the same people argue women should be encouraged to stay at home and raise families – while aware one provider is often no longer able to secure a high enough income nowadays (not enough to meet their material criteria anyway).

Whereas the left paints the picture of its own utopia, so does the right, without recognising that the “quiet suburban dream” is no longer attainable for many.

Disdain for universal healthcare 

You’d think ideologues who care so much about every human being would extend their preoccupation to those who are already born (or pregnant). The reality is right-wingers abhor health care programs aimed at assisting financially disadvantaged people, whom they perceive (and publicly depict) as scroungers.

It looks awfully like they’d be willing to let people die unassisted so healthcare could be focused solely on “those who deserve it” (those who pay into the system). Of course, governments don’t ask for public consent when they spend money on foreign wars, yet when it comes to constructing an internal scapegoat, where taxes go suddenly begins to matter.

As a rational human being, one can only wonder why keeping everyone alive is not the foremost priority of any establishment, next to which anything comes second. Anyhow, claiming to be a supporter of everyone’s right to life and at the same time seeking to deprive vulnerable people of medical coverage is contradictory. 

Warmongering and disregarding civilian “casualties”

Equally perplexing, especially among conservative Christians, is the support for military operations abroad, as results are reported back in the form of statistics, after the dead have been counted, many of them innocent civilians, whose lives should matter just as much as those in the west.

One cannot argue for the sacredness of life since conception while turning a blind eye to the massacres committed, in real time, in the name of imperialism.

Disdain for immigrants who apparently “breed like rabbits” and their “anchor babies”

We’re being overrun. It’s like a locust invasion. It’s white genocide. We’ll be minorities in our own countries in 20 years’ time.

The fine, fine irony of this matter is that most of these immigrants come from more conservative countries, which have not yet taken the progressive route. But their traditionalism and strong family values are not wanted by these conservatives. I’m not referring to the warped idea of religious fundamentalists regarding family life, but to the fact that in poorer countries, hedonism and nihilism tend to be less popular. Let’s take Hispanics in the US as an example. In Mexico alone, according to the latest census, 93% of people are Christian and typically have more than one child per family. The type of traditional life US conservatives would approve of, if their own (nation, race) adopted it.

Meanwhile, their children are, when parents are undocumented, referred to as “anchor babies”, which is dehumanising and derisory, as if they had less potential than their peers. The right-wing public discourse is that they don’t deserve to coexist and study with native children, implying they were “born for the wrong reasons”.

 

For those who are pro-life, conservatism might look like the only option forward – if they believe that politicians and pundits are indeed sincere in their intentions, and choose to ignore the rest of the proposed reforms, seeing this one issue as the most important.

Personally, I understand this and sympathise, but I do not think for a second that it’s anything more than empty rhetoric on conservatives’ part.

If any legislation is passed, it will be punitive and not compassionate or educational, as a culture of genuine compassion is the last thing they seem to be interested in. They certainly do not consider every human being, born or not, a person. These are the same people who advocate for dropping bombs on foreign towns and villages; the same people who advocate tearing families apart through deportation.

The same people who manifest visceral disgust towards the underprivileged, whether they are poor, uneducated, ill, unfairly stigmatised as dangerous or undocumented. What would lead us to think they are really preoccupied with the unborn?

My logical conclusion is that it’s an issue of supply and demand, of securing a voter niche; securing the loyalty of those who reject progressive views in that sense. Nothing more, nothing less.

 

 

The Anti-SJW Movement, Degenerating Into Alt-Right Rhetoric

The last two years have seen an explosion of justified rebutting of third wave feminism and identity politics, after seeing them embraced by young people in particular as a result of far left influences on their education.

What started as grassroots defiance against language policing and exaggerated victimisation gradually morphed into vacuous entertainment, to later develop a rather dangerous side-effect: desensitisation to the threat posed by right wing divisiveness, by focusing solely on the division caused by the left. Naturally, desensitisation slowly turned into acceptance and then sheer enthusiasm, as right-wing ideas saw the perfect momentum during the US presidential elections and have continued to reel in more enthusiasts for “change” ever since.

The preoccupation to be anti-left has taken such proportions that the anti-SJW movement has become a self-contradicting one, equating its initial fight for freedom of speech with a return to conservatism, which is equally fixated in its rigours as cultural Marxism and attracts the same amount of blind, fanatical devotion.

Suddenly, these former defenders of free speech saw an opportunity for leftists to be vilified beyond redemption and rejoiced, perhaps as some sort of vindication. Suddenly, those who had argued so compellingly for diversity of opinion became fixated on shutting up the left altogether, towards a “bright future” of conservative conformity.

Which proves once again that virtue and pacifism are apparels of the underdog, to be shed when said underdog reaches a position of power or at least has the illusion of being able to socially annihilate its opposition.

That is why solidarity with a group or movement should be questioned by the sympathetic individual every step of the way, lest it might degenerate into something completely different from what was initially intended.

Needless to say, many social justice warriors are easy targets. Whereas it makes sense to call out (with trumpets blaring) the abhorrent practice of destroying people’s livelihoods for perceived thought crimes, it also makes sense not to use disoriented teens as hate targets in anti-SJW videos.

In that sense I think it is a stretch for grown people to berate (down to nullification) 15 or 16-year-olds who post content on the internet without realising they are not mature enough to understand what they are propagating. For many of them this will undoubtedly be a phase in self-discovery and it seems unfair to conflate them with the genuinely dangerous individuals brainwashing them. The ugly side of this movement consists of running these kids through the mincer just to produce more of the same conveyor belt “look at these cretins”, self-indulgent type of entertainment.

While blowing social media duels out of proportion, people’s attention is being diverted from the reality of what a shift towards the right will really bring, much of which is cause for great concern.

In conclusion, this might have started out with the right intentions yet has become another mental trap, keeping many from seeing the broader picture and shifting the focus from important issues onto inconsequential minutiae.

 

Normality – The Phoenix

(No, this has nothing to do with recovery forums, although they have hijacked the powerful symbol of the phoenix and turned it into a cliche.)

Most of all, this post is an attempt to reach out to those who embrace (like I once did) the fight to preserve normality as it was understood in past decades in western societies  – revolving mostly around the concept of meritocracy, a free market, family values (including libertarian parenting), local traditions, prosperity and freedom (including the freedom to express one’s religion).

In the face of cultural Marxism, it’s easy for people who oppose it to be drawn towards conservative causes and groups; religion greatly strengthens this stance as well, defying militant secularism.

If previous years allowed a degree of doubt regarding the direction the west was headed in, (some considering the information regarding social engineering a conspiracy theory), now it’s plain to see that the moral foundation of past generations is energetically being cremated so a new one can be put in its place.

Traditionalism has lost the fight; it was lost before we were even born, as the agenda predates us. The question is if we really have to mentally go down with this ship, or if the ship itself is an illusion, a Fata Morgana. 

Majority versus counterculture 

Normality basically encompasses a set of conditions, principles, laws and values a generation is used to; by the time that generation is gone, things are radically different already – hence it is fluid and will continue to change throughout time. The majority embracing it at one point in time is seen as rigid, whilst the counterculture is meant to be innovative and progressive.

 

When clinging to this notion, we fail to see that traditionalist ideology has already been replaced with a completely different one and thus ceases to be normality; on the contrary, it is now the subversive way of the opposition. The word itself therefore becomes inadequate and irrelevant.

Of course, many of us associate it with what is logical and what has been proven to work best so far. An example is the nuclear family; monogamy makes sense from a biological point of view, as each individual benefits from knowing their lineage. A great warning against procreating randomly consists of the few -but very disturbing – cases of involuntary incest, when siblings who were unaware of being related met in adulthood to form couples and even had children of their own. Reality beats fiction sometimes.

Logic aside, conservatives are now the opposition – which is a paradox in itself.

Normality and law

In past centuries, states didn’t have to simulate democracy and could pass any wacky idea into law, such as taxing people for the sunlight entering their homes according to the number of windows they had (London, 1696). Anything went.

Nowadays they tend to be more subtle about it and familiarise people with the issues they ultimately impose, in order to prevent unrest. Before being formalised, culture is planned and diffused through education, through the media, through art and any influential aspect in a community. It does not belong to the masses; it never has.

Expecting to hold on to certain legal provisions is like expecting the powers that be to actually act in the best interest of the people they are meant to represent. That probably hasn’t happened since tribal communities. Worshiping man-made law (whether it’s something simple or a country’s own constitution) is a waste of energy – laws come and go; there’s nothing carved in stone or sacred about them. It also does not help to imagine one can use them in a corrupt system, before those who have never cared about them and never will.

The best generation

When people stand for this notion today, they usually rely on the image they had of the world while growing up, their familiarity and their emotional attachment to that image, providing a feeling of safety, which is human nature I suppose.

However, if we look at the whole picture history paints, can we really be so sure our generation has reached the ideal concept of living, surpassing all previous ones and any that may come in the future? It’s like stopping the clock and wanting to hold it still, with a bit of entitlement or arrogance. Obviously, I’m not arguing the currently proposed model (some type of socialism) is appealing in the slightest; however; I have to wonder if it’s wise to assume we have it all figured out. After all, every age has its nostalgic aspects, whilst others hardly ever evoke that feeling (drafts, workhouses, pandemics).

Life is relatively short. Whereas to us what we’re familiar with and want to maintain within our lifetime is a major issue, when compared to the endless chain of changes in history, this temporary concurrence of circumstances that we call OUR NORMALITY is a drop in the ocean. 

What doesn’t change

Seeing we have no control over where our world is heading, it makes sense to try to establish what is within our grasp, and that is our own nature.

It’s fascinating to think that although living conditions and mentalities were so different hundreds or thousands of years ago, human nature has largely remained the same, psychologically and spiritually, as attested by historical records. Our normality doesn’t have to depend on others; it can consist simply of the values we will never change, regardless of how regimes and paradigms evolve around us.

The search for those timeless elements within us, for the continuity and regeneration, away from the mental constraints of any artificially imposed culture, is what makes life worth living (or so I think anyway). This search is individual, not collective, and does not rely on maintaining the status quo.

 

In conclusion, it’s obviously worth getting worked up about matters which affect us or will affect us down the line, and try to stop them if possible. But that doesn’t mean emotionally suffering when seeing another bit of our old reality chipped away. The same mechanisms which have operated before us will keep operating throughout our lives and after we die. It’s just a matter of remaining human in the process.