Later Edit

It now becomes apparent that the humour employed in this post is derisory and might’ve gone a bit too far. There is no need to be sarcastic regarding someone’s confusion, especially if they appropriate labels established by other people, at a vulnerable age, due to their environment.

The labels themselves, however, warrant more than slight scepticism. It would be interesting to see the science behind them, should there be any, as they attempt to box people in according to a few variations in personality traits.

 

Surprisingly, I find myself linking to a Daily Mail article (though other publications have picked up the story as well). Also, this video  and this other video come to mind.

The list on the survey given to English school kids as young as 13 regarding their gender comprised 25 options; however, the last three were “not sure”, “rather not say” and “others”, the latter being hilarious since the masters of language-twisting have already stretched the limits of their own creativity. Who the hell can come up with others? Unless, of course, non-human or partially human labels are accepted as well.

Pandering to identity politics activism, the educational system is introducing more of it into schools, to further confuse young people, some teenagers doubtlessly being left unable to recognise the world they grew up in as children. Today, nothing seems to make much sense.

Not surprisingly, in order to compile such a long list, they had to use reworded labels and definitions over and over again.

To start with, the list includes the conventional “boy”, “girl”, “male”, “female”, “young man” and “young woman”. The only difference between “boy” and “young man” is coming of age, which has nothing to do with gender. Hence they could have simply used any pair of the three, the other two pairs being superfluous. Instead, they multiplied them and ended up with six different options.

“Trans-girl” and “trans-boy”, fair enough, that does apply to real life, though the age of the label being applied is ridiculously low nowadays and many argue even toddlers are able to make an accurate choice regarding their gender identity (besides choosing to be Batman or Harry Potter). One is referred to as an adult at 18 for specific reasons; minors need legal representatives when making crucial decisions; however, social justice warriors argue young kids are able to give informed consent to be mutilated with gender reassignment operations and put on cancer-inducing hormone “treatments”.

Then there is “tomboy”. That is not a gender. That word has been used for a very long time to describe very active girls who enjoy boys’ hobbies and hang around boys, but that says nothing about one’s main lifestyle choices or gender.

“Gender fluid” is said to describe those who have “different gender identities at different times”. Basically, they are two or more people in one body, presumably choosing a different name for each one, perhaps different clothes and voices. This sounds a bit like multiple personality disorder, with the difference that the person is aware of switching between identities. I’m assuming it doesn’t refer to those who pretend to be of their natural gender in order to avoid stigma, and present as their chosen gender on occasion. This is about people who genuinely feel they have two different identities; one male and one female. Or another couple selected from this list… or more, who knows. We are legion. Let’s just hope no young man chooses to incorporate – as his female side – the identity of his dead mother, who lies mummified in a basement.

“Agender” – “those with no gender identity or a neutral identity”. This term was invented on planet Earth, yet does not apply to it. You can talk about asexuality, which refers to the lack of sexual attraction towards one sex or another, or the lack of sex drive. But every single child is brought up as a boy or girl and thus develops a gender identity, adding to the hormonal predispositions they are born with. I’ve heard of people switching from male to female and vice-versa, but never of having / believing to have/ wishing to have no gender at all. Though the current experimental generation being brought up in Sweden might one day include many of these uprooted, confused people.

“Androgynous – partly male and female; of indeterminate sex”. So I assume androgynous people are androgynous at all times, unlike the gender fluid, who contain multitudes. Let’s look on the bright side – if at some point they deliberately try to confuse others through their appearance, at least they won’t go the way of suing people for misgendering them.

“Bi-gender – those who experience two gender identities, either at the same time or varying between the two.” If it happens at the same time, one is androgynous, right? And if it varies, one is gender fluid. So there was no need to add “bi-gender” at all.

From here on, everything apart from intersex is repeated and reworded, with nothing truly distinct being added.

“Non-binary” – basically androgynous.

“Demi-boy and demi-girl” – basically androgynous.

“Genderqueer – those who do not subscribe to traditional gender distinctions” – so basically androgynous or agender, if there really is such a thing.

“Gender non-conforming” – the exact same thing with a different name.

“Tri-gender – shifts between three genders, which could include male, female and gender-less or be another combination”. So basically gender fluid.

“All genders – someone who identifies as all possible gender options”. A label which teaches us that either gender doesn’t really exist or this person has so many identities they are worth studying. Anyway, gender fluid would cover this one as well.

“In the middle of boy and girl” – how many more categories based on androgyny can they make up?

“Intersex – someone with genetic, hormonal and physical features that may be thought typical of both male and female”. That is a genuine distinction for once, though chances are people born intersex eventually choose which gender suits them better.

OK. Now that we’re done with genders.

If we think that any gender could be of any sexual orientation as well, things really get complicated.

Forget being attracted to both sexes as a tricky situation – imagine what happens if you have multiple identities and each of them has their own sexual preference or preferences. What if you’re biologically female, gender fluid, sometimes feeling female and sometimes male, and you’re attracted to men? Does that make you a straight woman or a gay man, or both? Is your partner considered bisexual by default, as you alternate between identities?

And if you’re androgynous, how can you tell if you’re gay or straight? Very confusing indeed.

Not to worry though, confusion isn’t all bad, at least that’s what “genderfuckers” think. No, honestly, that’s a word; it describes those who include traits belonging to both sexes in their appearance, for the fun of it, such as bearded men in skirts or high heels. It’s a thing now. Apparently.

UPDATE

After more pondering on this complicated issue, there are even more questions to ask regarding the implications of generally accepting the fact that people can have two or more genders simultaneously.

Is every gender one is thought to have associated with a distinct identity?

When one thinks of themselves as interchangeably male and female, it makes sense to appear as such in order to make the change recognisable by others (to be treated as their chosen gender at the time of their choice). That would mean alternating between a male and female appearance, a male and a female name and potentially other characteristics as well. It doesn’t make sense to be Miss John or Mr Lilly. And sure enough, a simple search on “gender fluid” reveals people who do dress differently and adopt different names.

If so, how often are these identities interchangeable? 

Some suggest a choice is made each day according to how male or female or agender that person feels that morning. It makes sense (to the extent any of this can make sense) for the choice/ identity to last as long as the appearance does.

I don’t suppose switching every five minutes is likely; I can just picture a dialogue:

“Do you really think that about me?”

“No, that was Dan.”

“So you’re… Dana now?”

“No, Dana doesn’t think that way either. Only Dan.”

“So you’re not Dana either? Like, right now, who are you?”

“I just realised I had a completely different side as well; genderqueer; I think I’ll name them Dingo.”

“So… that would make you genderqueer as well? You as in your… source… identity?”

“No, silly; I’m trigender. Only Dingo is genderqueer.”

Trigender? Kind of like the Holy Trinity, three different entities who are simultaneously one being? Is that applicable to humans?”

I’m quite confident it wouldn’t work that way (and sorry if that sounds very insensitive).

What legal implications are there to identifying as more than one person?

Even if one’s personality remains the same all throughout, with opinions and attitudes being consistent, which is less confusing than having different personalities as well.

Purely for administrative purposes – how would having two or more identities work in terms of getting a job and on occasion turning up as somebody else? Which identity is legally responsible and would this person sign with a different name according to how they felt that day? Does anyone else see how that would be a problem?

“About that raise you mentioned, Dana…”

“Ask Dan. He’s got to sign for it. He’s not in right now and I can’t forge his signature. That wouldn’t be right; I would be breaching my own rights.”

“Uh… When is he…due back?”

“When I feel more male.”

“Can you.. like… give him a call, at least? How do you contact him? Is he… in there? Of sort? Do you have to conjure him up? Because right now it feels like you’re just being a bitch not wanting to give me a raise.”

Surely nothing this ridiculous would happen – however,  though it’s hard to imagine outside of creating humour, if the law protects someone’s right to emulate the Holy Trinity if they so wish, who’s to say that employers won’t be forced to do so as well? That would be a first in granting someone the privilege to sign using two or three different names, which would be illegal for the rest of us.

Is gender really just a state of mind?

My question is simple (and logical I dare think) : if biologically, gender-specific traits are determined by hormones (testosterone for men and estrogen for women), how can anyone be SURE they identify as the opposite sex, without having had a genuine experience of what that is?

Intersex people are actually born with male and female characteristics, at a physical level, which gives them a combined experience, therefore they are unique in that sense. However, most people are not.Chemistry is a real issue here; hormones play a significant role in the perceptions and behaviour of a human being.

Perhaps men who think they are partially female identify with their image of women, without knowing exactly how women feel, and vice-versa, because that would be impossible.When somebody says “today I feel more male”, what they must mean is “today I feel like displaying characteristics I interpret as being male”.

The intention behind my post is not to pointlessly cause offence but to doubt the rationale behind this very popular tendency of fragmenting people’s identities.